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Purpose

The purpose of Freemasonry is to help good men become better ones. This is accomplished through mutual support, instruction which is often in the form of time honored ritual, and by working together to make their community a better place for all. It is an ancient and very honorable Order which has through the long centuries attracted some of the most respected and noted men in history. We invite you to learn more.

What is Freemasonry?

The purpose of Freemasonry is to help good men become better ones. This is accomplished through mutual support, instruction which is often in the form of time honored ritual, and by working together to make their community a better place for all. It is an ancient and very honorable Order which has through the long centuries attracted some of the most respected and noted men in history. We invite you to learn more.

Is Freemasonry a charity?

It is not, though it teaches and practices charity. American Masons give an estimated $1 billion dollars a year to charity, the largest sum of any private group in the world. All Lodges support local charities in their neighborhoods while the Grand Lodges have worthy causes they support within their jurisdictions and nationwide. All of this is in additional the charitable acts of the numerous Masonic organizations, both national and international in scope. The Shrine, which requires members to be Masons, as one example, has 23 hospitals in the United States, Canada and Mexico which provide, at no cost, orthopedic, burn and spinal-cord injury treatment to children without regard to race, creed or Masonic affiliation. And though Masons contribute monetarily and by service, their greatest contribution comes from living their lives in such a manner that the world is better because they live in it.

Is Freemasonry a religion?

To become a Mason a man must profess a belief in God; however, Masonry is not a religion, a substitute for, or a rival of any doctrine. Masonry does not perform the functions of a church, has no sacraments, and makes no claim to save souls or reform sinners.

Why are the rituals and ceremonies secret?

There have been times and places where promoting equality, freedom of thought or liberty of conscience was dangerous. By tradition Masons, especially those in other nations, have learned to be circumspect in their actions.

Also, Masonic ritual is not pageantry but is meant to convey important spiritual and moral lessons. Such characteristics as virtue, honor and mercy, such virtues as temperance, fortitude, prudence and justice are empty clich├ęs and hollow words unless presented within an ordered framework. The lessons are not secret but the presentation is kept private to promote a clearer understanding in good time.

What about all those symbols?

Masonic symbols have been taken from stonemason’s tools and endowed with certain worthwhile meanings. The square “teaches us to regulate our lives and actions by the Masonic rule and line, and so to correct and harmonize our conduct as to render us acceptable to the Divine Being, from Whom all goodness emanates…” The compasses “remind us of the Divine Being’s unerring and impartial justice…”

Ever Considered Becoming a Mason?

Freemasonry is a many faceted organization. The Masonic family has a place for anyone of good character who believes in a Supreme Being. Does that sound quaint to modern ears? Perhaps. But that’s all right; we think we’re more timeless than quaint.

What got us here is our shared values, and shared values are what keep us involved. We’re not going to tell you what your political leanings ought to be, and we’re not going to tell you how to worship God, as you see Him. We may differ therefore on the finer points of our politics and theology. Freemasons understand that men of good character may hold different opinions in such matters yet still be men of integrity. We agree to respect each other’s ‘sovereignty’ or self-rule over these issues, and instead focus on the points we have in common:

  • We love our families and care for our children, our widows and orphans.
  • We are motivated to help our communities and protect the unfortunate, the weak, the young or old.
  • We all want to become better men – better fathers or grandfathers, better husbands, better workers or leaders.
  • In this, we don’t compete against each other; this is a matter of personal improvement against our younger selves, as we mature.
  • We understand the value of listening to the lessons of history.
  • Many Masons are well-versed in history and philosophy, seeking to enjoy a lifetime of learning and growth. The Fraternity provides a wealth of opportunity for this pursuit. It’s been said that there has been more written over the years about Masonry than any other subject except religion. Others take advantage of the numerous social functions offered by Lodges and our associated (we call them appendent) groups. The Shrine is a good example of the light-hearted side of the Fraternity. Other Masons relish in the many charitable and community projects we support, like local philanthropy, our support of childrens’ hospitals, cancer research, our Child ID program and the thousands of events of unheralded daily charity that men of good character perform each day.

    How do you join?

    Ask a Master Mason and he in turn will be happy to guide you, and more pertinent information will be provided. If you don’t know a Mason, send us an email.

    A Mason: From the Grand Lodge of Arizona

  • A Mason is a man who professes a faith in God. As a man of faith, he uses the tools of moral and ethical truths to serve mankind.
  • A Mason binds himself to like-minded men in a brotherhood that transcends all religious, ethnic, social, cultural, and educational differences.
  • In fellowship with his brothers, a Mason finds ways in which to serve his God, his family, his fellow man, and his country.
  • A Mason is dedicated. He recognizes his responsibility for justice, truth, charity, enlightenment, freedom, liberty, honesty and integrity in all aspects of human endeavor.
  • A Mason is all this and more.
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